Watercraft Inspection Station Announcement:

Alpine Meadows station will be open normal hours Thursday through Sunday starting September 11.

Meyers and Spooner stations will be closed for the remainder of September due to wildfire impacts.

Appointments for September 16th – 30th can be made starting September 13th. We will continue to accept walk-ins as well.

Continue to monitor our Social media sites (@TahoeBoating) at Twitter and Facebook  for updates on closures. 

Load More...

Lake Tahoe, CA/NV – As inspection stations open Saturday for the first time this year, agencies managing Tahoe’s aquatic invasive species boat inspection program expect a strong start to the season and possibly long waits, according to the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency and the Tahoe Resource Conservation District who lead the program.

Warm weekend weather and anticipation among boaters are converging at a time when inspectors are not at full staff and some still in training, which can reduce capacity at the three regional inspection stations. Boaters needing an inspection may experience long waits and are encouraged to change plans if possible or schedule an appointment. Boats that still have an intact inspection seal from the last time they were hauled out of Lake Tahoe do not need an inspection are ready to launch.

Weekends and holidays are likely to remain busy throughout the summer, according to the agencies. Boaters are encouraged to drop-in or make appointments on weekdays to avoid potential delays. Optional appointments can be scheduled for a fee on any available date through September 30.

Showing up to the inspection station Clean, Drained, and Dry will help keep the waters of the Tahoe Region safe and get boaters on the water faster. Paddlers and non-motorized watercraft owners should make sure their craft and equipment are Clean, Drained, and Dry and dispose of any plants or debris before entering a new water body, even within other lakes of the Tahoe Region. Paddlers should learn how to self-inspect and become a Tahoe Keeper, according to the agencies.

The Lake Tahoe Aquatic Invasive Species Program is implemented by 40 public and private partner organizations, including federal, state, and local jurisdictions, research partners, public utility districts, and private marinas. The Tahoe Regional Planning Agency and the Tahoe Resource Conservation District lead the program in collaboration with the public and private partners. The program’s mission is to prevent, detect, and control aquatic invasive species in the region so that future generations can enjoy Lake Tahoe. For additional information, contact Jeff Cowen, Tahoe Regional Planning Agency Public Information Officer, via email or at 775-589-5278.